Kwasi Wiredu is one of the foremost African philosopher and intellectual in the field. One of Wiredu's most prominent discussions revolves around the Akan concept of personhood. He believe this traditional framework hosts a two part conception of a person. First, and most intuitive to Western conceptions of persons, is the ontological dimension. This includes one's biological constitution. Further, Wiredu states that the second dimension, the normative conception of personhood, is based on one's ability to will freely. One's ability to will freely is dependent on one's ethical considerations.

Kwasi Wiredu, Distinguished ProfessorKwasi Wiredu is one of the foremost African philosopher and intellectual in the field. He is currently a distinguished professor of philosophy at university of South Florida , Tampa , where he has taught since 1987.

He was born in Kumasi, Ghana in 1931 and attended Adisadel Secondary School from 1948 to 1952. It was during this period that he discovered philosophy, through Plato (which weaned him from his interest in Practical Psychology) and Bertrand Russell, and he gained a place at the University of Ghana, Legon. After graduating in 1958 with a degree in philosophy, he went on to Oxford.

At Oxford, Wiredu wrote a thesis on "Knowledge, Truth, and Reason." Upon graduating in 1960 he was appointed to a teaching post at the University College of North Staffordshire (now the University of Keele), where he stayed for a year. He then returned to Ghana, where he accepted a post teaching philosophy for his old university. He remained at the University of Ghana for twenty-three years, during which time he became first Head of Department and then Professor.

Wiredu has held visiting professorships at the University of California, Los Angeles (1979-1980), University of Ibadan , Nigeria (1984) University of Richmond , Virginia (N.E.H. Distinguished Professor, Spring 1985), Carleton College , Minnesota (Donald J. Cowling Visiting Professor, Fall 1986) and Duke University , North Carolina (1994-95 and 1999-2001). He has also held fellowships at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars (1985) and the National Humanities Center, North Carolina (Spring 1986).

He was a member of the Committee of Directors of the International Federation of Philosophical Societies from 1983 to 1998. He has also been a fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars (1985) and the National Humanities Center, North Carolina (1986). Also, he is the Vice-President of the Inter-African Council for Philosophy, and has been recently become Professor Emeritus at the University of South Florida.

One of Wiredu's most prominent discussions revolves around the Akan concept of personhood. He believe this traditional framework hosts a two part conception of a person. First, and most intuitive to Western conceptions of persons, is the ontological dimension. This includes one's biological constitution. Further, Wiredu states that the second dimension, the normative conception of personhood, is based on one's ability to will freely. One's ability to will freely is dependent on one's ethical considerations. One can be said to have free will if one has a high regard to ethical responsibilities. This then designates a person to become a person. One is not born a person but becomes one through events and experiences that lead one to act ethically. This differs from the Western conception of personhood in that people, in Akan traditional thought, are not born a willed being.

He has published articles in Logic, Epistemology and African Philosophy and has written entries in encyclopedias and anthologies. His book Philosophy and an African Culture was published by Cambridge University Press in 1980. Person and Community: Ghanaian Philosophical Studies was jointly edited by him and Kwame Gyekye and published in 1992 by the Council for Research in Values and Philosophy, New York . His Cultural Universals and Particulars: An African Perspective, (Bloomington: Indiana University Press) appeared in 1996. He also edited A Companion to African Philosophy, published by Blackwell in 2004. Kwasi Wiredu was a member of the Committee of Directors of the International Federation of Philosophical Societies from 1983-1998.

His study of the still influential colonial accounts of African thought has led him to raise some fundamental questions about philosophy and culture and, in particular, about the philosophical conditions of inter-cultural dialogue. Investigation encounters intersections with epistemological and ethical issues.